Original Civil War

Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby

Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby
Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby

Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby   Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby

Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case - Sgt John W Crosby. Civil War era 1/16 Plate Tintype Photograph in Case.

Crosby, 5th New Hampshire Infantry. Died March 18, 1898 as Col. Fought Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Antietam, Ball's Bluff, Cold Harbor and Chancellorsville. The case measures 2 inches x 1 3/4 inches. Very Good Condition with case spine intact!

Initial service with the Milford Volunteers; b. On or about June 12,'61; disch. July 12,'61, as 1 Sergt.

Crosby then joined the 5th New Hampshire Infantry, Co. He lost his right arm by a wound, on the front line, within a few yards of the famous "stone wall, " at Fredericksburg. Was post Provost Marshal of the substitute camp at Concord, N. From September to December, 1863.

Crosby was born in Lowell, Mass. His boyhood was passed in that city, in Nashua, and Worcester, Mass. He was descended from Revolutionary stock; his great- grandfather, Josiah Crosby, commanded a company at the battle of Bunker Hill. His father, Josiah Crosby, was one of the pioneers in cotton manufacturing in New England, and made an early but unsuccessful effort to establish the industry in the South, having attempted to start a cotton mill in Natchez, Miss.

More than half a century ago. This project was discouraged by the cotton planters of that section at the time, and was finally abandoned. While in Worcester he commenced to learn the printer's trade, but abandoned it and went West, connecting himself for a time with the Dubuque Ia. At the breaking out of the Mormon rebellion in 1853 he entered the service of the United States government, and was engaged for a time in the transportation of supplies from St.

To the troops in the vicinity of Salt Lake City. A little later he journeyed overland to California, where the gold excitement was then at its height, and remained upon the Pacific coast for some years. When Sumter was fired upon he promptly enlisted, shouldered a musket and went to the front with the Fifth New Hampshire Volunteers, a regiment that became famous in war annals as The Fighting Fifth. He was rapidly promoted through the various non-commissioned offices to orderly sergeant; then commissioned second lieutenant, and later promoted to first lieutenant. He saw much hard fighting, taking part in such memorable battles as Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Antietam, Ball's Bluff, Cold Harbor, and Chancellorsville.

At the battle of Fredericksburg, he lost his right arm, but as soon as he had partially recovered he reentered tho service, and barely six months later he participated in the battle of Gettysburg. At the close of the war he settled in Milford, and began the study of law in the office of Hon.

He finally relinquished his law studies to accept a clerkship in the Milford post office. When General Grant was inaugurated president in 1869, one of the first appointments that he made was that of John W. Crosby to be postmaster of Milford. He was reappointed by every succeeding president, including Cleveland, up to 1895, when he was compelled by ill health to tender his resignation.

He was for a number of years local express agent and manager of the local office of the Western Union Telegraph Co. For several years he was actively connected with the N. National Guard, in which he rose to the position of lieutenant-colonel of the First regiment. He was a member of Massachusetts Commandery of the Loyal Legion; of the New Hampshire chapter of the Sons of the Revolution; of the Grand Army; of the Odd Fellows, and of the United Order of the Golden Cross.

When the town celebrated its centennial anniversary in 1894 Colonel Crosby acted as chairman of the centennial committee, and he was also a member of the committee chosen to prepare a history of the town. Just before entering the army he was married to Elmira J.

Shattuck, a native of New Ipswich, who survived him. Besides a widow, he left one son, C. Fred Crosby, and one daughter, Mrs.

In all the relations of life Colonel Crosby was honorable and upright, an affectionate and devoted husband and father, a zealous and painstaking official, and an enterprising and public-spirited citizen. Generous and kind-hearted almost to a fault, lie never turned a deaf ear to a story of distress, and hundreds of persons can testify to his kindly exertions in their behalf in times of misfortune and trouble. Colonel Crosby was an active and deeply-interested member of the committee to prepare the town history, and until the condition of his health compelled him to abandon all work, was a most helpful assistant, especially in the preparation of that portion of the volume relating to the town's quota in the Civil War.

He died March 18, 1898, and was buried in the West cemetery. Source: THE HISTORY OF MILFORD, GEORGE A. FAMILY REGISTERS BY WILLIAM P. COMMITTEE OF PUBLICATION: GEORGE A. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Militaria\Civil War (1861-65)\Original Period Items\Photographs". The seller is "blue-crab-antiques-inc" and is located in this country: US. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Featured Refinements: Civil War Tintype
  • 5th New Hampshire Infantry: John W Crosby
  • Modified Item: No
  • Country/Region of Manufacture: United States
  • Theme: Militaria
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Conflict: Civil War (1861-65)

Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby   Civil War Tintype Photograph in Case Sgt John W Crosby