Original Civil War

Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam

Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam

Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam    Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam
"Thunder at Dawn" by Mark Maritato Oil on Linen Canvas Museum Quality Original Artwork! Artwork/Image Size 36" wide x 24" tall Framed as shown 39-1/2" x 27-1/2" Painting was exhibited in Green County Council of the Arts Gallery show "Undaunted Valor" Show Catskill, New York 2012.

Description of Artwork: this beautiful Oil Painting depicts the Confederate artillery battery of Captain W. Parker (Virginia) of Stephen D. Lee's Battalion while engaged near the Dunker Church during the morning action of the battle of Antietam Creek Maryland (Sharpsburg) September 17th 1862.

Historical Description: The morning of September 17th 1862 dawned foggy along the banks of Antietam Creek Maryland. All throughout the previous day of the 16th, two armies had gathered and drew up their lines in the fields, woodlots and ridges surrounding the small sleepy hamlet of Sharpsburg. The Union Army of the Potomac commanded by George B.

Lees Confederate Army of Northern Virginia. It was Lees first invasion onto Northern soil in an attempt to get England and France to officially recognize the Confederate Government. Everything hung in the balance for Lee and the Confederacy. All throughout the 16th of September there had been scattered fighting between the opposing forces all along the line but the true bloodletting had not yet occurred. The stage was set; both Armies hunkered down for the night waiting what the next day would bring. The armies slept through a rainy and drizzly night, no doubt adding to the feeling of uncertainty as to what will occur when the sun came up. When the skies began to lighten on the morning of September 17th the ball opened. Federal artillery posted along the North Woods and across the Antietam Creek began to shell Confederate artillery positions located on an open plateau of ground adjacent to a large woodlot known as the West Woods and a small white Baptist church known locally as the Dunker Church. In front of the church ran the Hagerstown Turnpike, a road that led from Sharpsburg to Hagerstown Maryland. Lee commanded the Confederate artillery Battalion posted in this sector.

Captain William Watts Parker, a Doctor by profession and a native of Richmond Virginia commanded one of the batteries in Lees battalion. After having served in the 15th Virginia Infantry during the first eight months of the war, Parker was motivated to raise a company of infantry in response to the growing numbers of Federal enemy troops. In a February 21st letter that was published in one of Richmonds Newspapers, Parker asked for volunteers to serve in a company of honest sober men, no one need suffer in his morals. We expect every man in this company, who conducts himself a gentleman to be treated accordingly.

Volunteers were quickly raised over the following weeks. The men who answered the call for volunteers were young, genial and upstanding individuals mostly from Richmond and its immediate environs, who exemplified the qualities Parkers had been seeking.

Because of the youthful appearance and the average age of Parkers volunteers of 14 to 23, the company had come to be known locally as The Boy Company. After the infantry company had been formed and its officers elected it was decided by Captain Parker that they would organize into a battery of Artillery in order to vastly improve their independence, prominence and impact on actions than as a company of infantry. By September of 1862, Parkers battery consisted of two three inch rifled guns and three twelve-pound Howitzer cannons. On the morning of the 17th Parkers battery faced the full fury of Federal artillery. The plateau in front of the Dunker Church of which the battery occupied became a fiery sulfurous cauldron of screaming, exploding artillery shells and moving lines of infantry.

Parkers Men worked feverishly pouring a destructive fire into seemingly endless lines of Federal infantry attacking Confederate infantry through a large cornfield about 500 yards in front of the batterys position as well as along the Hagerstown Turnpike. The struggle swayed back and forth between the opposing masses of infantry with terrible unrelenting savagery and confusion in the fields before Parkers Battery. All throughout the action, Stephen D. Lees Artillery battalion along with Parkers Virginia battery held the same position, suffering destruction and casualties while dealing them in return. Shells shattered caissons; men and battery horses fell with appalling regularity.

Private George Jones narrowly escaped injury when a round he was ramming down the burning hot barrel prematurely exploded; sending the ramrod down-range clumsily toward the enemy. The mishap temporarily blinded Jones but he stayed at his post. One of the youngest boys in the company, Private John Truman, who had enlisted with the battery without his mothers knowledge or permission had his knee shattered to the point of needing amputation. Truman would later die of his injury. Another Young Lad 15 year old Kenny Richardson was initially placed well behind the guns position but was pressed into service when the original crew began to dwindle. An exploding shell killed Richardson instantly.

Despite suffering from an illness during the barrage, Captain Parker seemed to be The coolest man on the field, riding amongst his guns inspiring his men. The excitement of the moment seemed to transform the old Doctor into a consummate warrior. As the morning progressed, Federal infantry began to mass in greater numbers on the Western side of the Hagerstown Turnpike and in the West Woods itself.

Colquitts and Trimbles Brigades were being pushed back toward Parkers guns and the plateau soon became a much more dangerous place to be. Parker then gave the survivors of his Battery order to limber up and move the guns new ground. As Sergeant Hallowell limbered up his gun and began to move it to the rear, a Federal shell burst, killing the lead horse of his team and mutilating the leg of 16 year old lead driver George Warburton. Although Parkers Battery would continue to see full service on many more battlefields including, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville Virginia and Gettysburg Pennsylvania, the action that Parkers small unit took part in on this morning along the banks of the Antietam, forever became known afterward as Artillery Hell. Provenance: Direct from the artist.

Notes: Artist Mark Maritato is an acclaimed and very popular painter of historical subjects. His large oil paintings of military battles now reside in many private and institutional collections around the world. Maritato has brought historical events alive on his canvases. It was his love for art and history that has led Mr.

Maritato to pursue a career in fine art. Maritato formally studied painting and illustration at the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn New York. It was while a student at Pratt that Mr.

Maritato first began to paint military historical subjects with the Civil War period being the main focus. Mark Maritato's paintings are renowned among private collectors and public institutions for their high degree of historical accuracy and attention to realistic detail. Maritato creates starts with many months or sometimes years of research in order to ensure that the historical depictions are highly accurate.

Maritato's academic training comes through in every painting he creates, following in the tradition of the worlds masters of historical fine art. Collections: The Zadock Pratt Museum, Prattsville, NY Hunterstown Historical Society, Gettysburg Pennsylvania Monmouth Battlefield State Park - Manalapan / Freehold Township New Jersey Belle Grove Plantation Museum at the Cedar Creek Battlefield - Middletown VA Daughters of the American Revolution - Hudson New York Chapter The US Army Soldier Systems Center Harley Davidson Inc. Gettysburg Pennsylvania Airliewood Mansion - Holly Springs Mississippi Carter House Museum and Visitors Center - Franklin National Battlefield Park - Franklin, Tennessee The City of Oswego New York The Bayside Historical Society at Fort Totten, Bayside Queens New York The Lackawanna Historical Society - Scranton, PA SONY - Paramount - New York Various other corporate and private collections worldwide. Publications and Exhibitions: Historical Advisor: "To Appomattox" Historical Television Miniseries - In Development.

Owen (Publishing in 2019) Texans at Antietam - A Terrible Clash of Arms, September 16-17 1862 by Joe Owen, Philip McBride and Joe Allport Texans at Gettysburg - Blood and Glory with Hood's Texas Brigade by Joe Owen and Randy Drais C-Span3 - Presentation on the Battle of Franklin Tennessee C-Span - "The Battle of Chancellorsville 1863" by Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park Historian Frank O'Reilly The Union Divided - Union/Confederate War Gaming Boxed Sets - Gordon and Hague War games "The Fellers Called him Bill" 3-Volume Book Set by P. Kearns "American Ride" BYUtv Show "The Colorbearers" - PBS Documentary Film Wayside Exhibits - The U. National Park Service at Manassas National Battlefield Park - Manassas Virginia Novel Cover: "Lightning from the West" by Fred Melchiore Novel Cover: "Fire Within - Copperheads and the Civil War" by Fred Melchiore America's Civil War Magazine - Various Editions Gettysburg Magazine - Special Publication Civil War Art Magazine - Special Publication. Connecticut artist Mark Maritato has been known for many years as a painter of historical subjects. His large oil paintings and prints of military battles now grace many private and institutional collections around the world.

We reserve the right to refuse sale to ANYONE for ANY reason. Item is subject to prior sale. Once the 14-day period has elapsed the sale is final, no exceptions. If you have any questions about anything regarding this offering please feel free to ask, we are more than happy to help answer your questions!

The item "Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam" is in sale since Sunday, February 23, 2020. This item is in the category "Art\Paintings". The seller is "landmarkstudios" and is located in Danbury, Connecticut. This item can be shipped worldwide.
  • Size: Medium (up to 36in.)
  • Region of Origin: US
  • Artist: Mark Maritato
  • Style: Realism
  • Listed By: Artist
  • Quantity Type: Single-Piece Work
  • Painting Surface: Linen Canvas
  • Medium: Oil on Linen Canvas - Framed
  • Date of Creation: 2000-Now
  • Original/Reprint: Original
  • Battle Depicted: Battle of Antietam / Sharpsburg, Maryland
  • Year: 2006
  • Features: Framed
  • Historical Period: American Civil War
  • Original/Reproduction: Original
  • Width (Inches): 36
  • Color: Multi-Color
  • Subject: Historical / Civil War / Confederate / Military
  • Special Attributes: Signed
  • Theme: Civil War
  • Signed?: Signed
  • Originality: Original
  • Height (Inches): 24

Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam    Original Mark Maritato Oil Painting Thunder at Dawn Military Civil War Antietam